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Do you think classics aren’t for you? Take a look at these and think again


You’d be surprised at the similarities between YA and classic novels. Books have always featured characters wanting something or someone they can’t have, rebels fighting against oppressive governments, naive humans being captivated by dangerous and stunningly attractive supernatural creatures – and we’re going to offer some suggestions of classics with these very things!

I just read the most wonderful story

If you liked ‘The Hunger Games’ then you might like ‘The Lottery’

1

This incredible short story by Shirley Jackson is one of the inspirations for ‘The Hunger Games’. Jackson’s stories usually centre around small American towns and the suffocation and cruelty that can breed there – it often ends in violence and death. She’s a wonderful, wonderful storyteller.

If you liked ‘Solitaire’ then you might like ‘A Catcher in the Rye’

2

Holden Caulfield is one of those characters that teens identify with wholly and adults often find annoying. When we first read ‘Solitaire’, Tori screamed Holden to us. They’re both deeply unimpressed by the world around them, struggle with mental health issues and you can’t always count on them to be a 100% reliable narrator.

If you like ‘Skulduggery Pleasant’ then you might like ‘Sherlock Holmes’

3

Though Sherlock Holmes may not be a magician (or a skeleton), he definitely has the same fearsome reputation as an amazing detective as Skulduggery Pleasant. Like in Derek Landy’s series, Holmes will take you to the dark, dingy and dangerous corners of London to solve impossible crimes and there’ll be some witty banter along the way.

If you like ‘Divergent’ then you might like ‘1984’

4

George Orwell is one of the godfathers of dystopia. Though the plots of these two novels aren’t very similar, the world Tris lives in and the world Winston Smith lives in are. They are controlled by their governments and watched everywhere they go, but that doesn’t stop a rebellion from rising up.

If you like ‘Only Ever Yours’ then you might like ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

5

Margaret Atwood’s most famous tale is also one of her most chilling. Offred has only one option in The Republic of Gilead: breed. If she deviates from the rules and regulations she’ll die for her crimes, but nothing can rid her of what she thinks and feels. ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is just as fiercely feminist and powerful as ‘Only Ever Yours’.

If you like ‘Fallen’ then you might like ‘Wuthering Heights’

6

You’re clearly a fan of melodrama and high romance and ‘Wuthering Heights’ has that in spades. We also think it’s another classic that is best read as a teenager when the pain and agony of your first and true love is still strong. There are windswept moors, ghosts, tortured minds and a love story that could also be called a hate story.

If you like ‘Vampire Academy’ then you might like ‘Carmilla’

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Both of these are among our very favourite books! Fans of ‘Vampire Academy’ tend to be suckers (pun completely intended) for tense, swoony romance and a hefty dose of risk and ‘Carmilla’ delivers that in spades. It’s only a short novella, but it has bite (whoops, and again).

Will you be picking up any of these classics? Let us know at @maximumpopbooks!

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Written by Sophie Waters

Sophie is the Head of Commercial at Maximum Pop! Having studied English Lit and Creative Writing at Bath Spa University, she came to MP! to satisfy her passion for books. Sophie is a diehard Hufflepuff and feminist. She's also a huge cat lover, and can often be found rocking her socks off at a gig.

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